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DACC Nursing Program Provides Answers in Accreditation Loss

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 - 7:41pm

LAS CRUCES — Doña Ana Community College school officials reached out to students and parents by sending letters detailing what the college's un-accredited nursing program means for them.

As News Channel 9 reported, the reason for the accreditation loss was a result of being understaffed. The college only had six full-time nurses teaching 109 students, which was at half of the requirement.

DACC released a list of frequently asked questions with answers on what current students should be aware of.

Among the FAQ's, the college clarified that accreditation was not required for proper licensing tests and that students graduating from the program should not see any difference in employment opportunites because most practices dont require students come from accredited programs.

The college also claimed most community college nursing programs dont have national accreditation because of its costs.

For a full list, download the PDF attachment below.

AttachmentSize
program.pdf93.89 KB
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Reader Comments

Last, the bigger question is ‘why’ DABCC cannot keep faculty which is the true underlying problem with their nursing program. Many nurse educators are aware of the problem which has been ongoing for greater than 7 years. The NLNAC has been slow to react and longsuffering in their effort to protect the students and give DABCC every opportunity to correct the problems and remain accredited. DABCC lost accreditation because non-nurses are trying to govern nursing, which is always very bad practice.

Schools such as UTEP or NMSU who have CCNE accreditation are bound to accept transfers from those graduates who have come from a nationally accredited program ONLY or risk their own accreditation status. Therefore, the loss of NLNAC means those students will have a harder time moving up to the BSN level as recommended by the Institute of Medicine’s Report related to nursing.

Second, it is a requirement to have graduated from a nursing program that has national nursing accreditation (NLNAC or CCNE) to be eligible for any federal or civil service registered nurse position, i.e.: Fort Bliss, Beaumont or Biggs Field. Third, educational mobility requires that a graduate come from a nationally accredited program in order to transfer to another school.

Second, it is a requirement to have graduated from a nursing program that has national nursing accreditation (NLNAC or CCNE) to be eligible for any federal or civil service registered nurse position, i.e.: Fort Bliss, Beaumont or Biggs Field. Third, educational mobility requires that a graduate come from a nationally accredited program in order to transfer to another school.

First, the NM Board of Nursing will be requiring NLNAC accreditation or other national nursing accreditation (CCNE) for ALL nursing programs who wish to operate in NM in the VERY near future. Accreditation is a national standard and reasonable expectation; almost ALL registered nurse programs have either NLNAC or CCNE accreditation to support quality nursing education to protect the public from poorly educated nurses and to protect students from academic thieves.

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